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FDRB3

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About FDRB3

  • Rank
    Creek Chub
  • Birthday 10/24/1992

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Bristol
  • TN Region
    East TN
  • Interests
    Fishing, learning new techniques and finding new favorite baits.
  1. Damiki Technique

    I do add eyes to most, I just hadnt added them in that photo. For me I try using red eyes for darker colors and white/gold holographic eyes for lighter colors. I have found that low profile eyes work best for the aspirin head though. They seem to stay on much better without having to glue or clear coat, and with the more protrusive eyes, it ends up just being the ball head profile, which is perfectly fine, I know guys much wiser than me that throw literally nothing but unpainted lead ball head jigs and most days put me to shame, but that just goes to show, confidence is key. But for clear, cold water fishing, and as slow as bites I’m encountering, I do believe this particular scenario does prove to favor as realistic a look as possible. I’ve been popping or wiggling my baits, and if you aren’t hit immediately, then I will hold it still for as long as 10-15 seconds, and sometimes the only way to know you have a bite with the thick gloves for this weather is to watch for little ripples off your line. It’s literally just about who can stand it the longest, and for me, this fishing is normal coming from a crappie fishing background, but I know people who would rather catch nothing and constantly cast than to have to sit through that kind of “torture”
  2. Damiki Technique

    these are the heads we pour, simple and very versatile. I mostly throw 1/4 for the slower rate of fall, but it’s so compact and cuts through the water so well it can still stay under your boat in moderate wind conditions. Will go slightly heavier in deeper and windier conditions, but the popping technique I use seems to work best with these heads, and they are great for tight lining swim baits too. Just slightly modified aspirin heads molds. Bait keeper is reversed just because I bite tip of plastics off and a bottom keeper doesn’t always work with certain brands (armor shad)
  3. Damiki Technique

    Thanks guys, I appreciate the advice and I’ll definately be trying it out this weekend again. Last time I was out was on Sunday and the temp was pretty low, biggest issue for us was line freezing up which kinda hindered our dropping. Started to cast out and let swing in under us instead and threw too shallow once got hung up on rock, wiggle it loose and then got hit good, casted a ned with hula stick on and it took off, guessing it was a catfish from how heavy it felt, and even knowing that, I spent far too much of my day casting and beating the bank with that damiki. I just get so caught up on certain aspects I can’t bring my mind to break from it. If I get a bite and don’t land it, I can forget about anywhere else I was planning on fishing because I can’t make my mind stop thinking that it’s something I’m doing instead of the fish. I have to learn to better manage my time whilst on the water and allow for some learning curve, try to make myself understand I’m not gonna bust em on the first cast. I’ll start keeping a log on water temp and depth, I try to take a photo of my fish along with lure and background so I can keep an accurate timeframe of time, location, and weather conditions as well as lure selections. I constantly change my retrieves and presentations and regardless of how few I catch from time to time, I’m always persistent and constantly looking for more ways to improve. I will definitely try all of these, I have found that downsizing is quite effective and I keep everything from 1” Bobby garlands to 5” Zman flukes.
  4. Damiki Technique

    We pour our own jigs too, I say moon eye because that’s what it most resembles. Just aspirin head with eyes on them. But I will give them a look. I’m just getting serious with bass fishing and trying to better my techniques every time I’m on the water so I want to have a comfortablity with a certain technique before I can feel confident enough to fish it when the time comes, and I’ll just tell, come spoon season, I’m probably the best net guy around, because I can’t catch them on a spoon, so i always end up with a Damiki on. And it seems here, you’re not gonna come up on active fish very often, and as new to finding fish as I am, my chances on persuading non-active fish are much better than finding active fish throughout the day. I was just wondering if I’ve probably gotten the hang of it, they just aren’t eating it like they were a year or two ago, or if I’m focusing too much on the wrong aspects instead of just keeping to a rhythm and being happy that I’m at least catching something.
  5. Damiki Technique

    Alright, this seems to be one of the most frustrating techniques I’ve used just because I see the fish looking at it and can’t get them to take it. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve caught quite a few fish on it, and love when they do take it, but it seems like this winter they’ve just been tough on south Holston. So I am asking what it is that makes you more confident in your bait. Personally, I prefer all white, 1/4 mooneye jig with white and black eye, white Damiki, also I bite quarter inch off head of bait to prevent more missed fish than necessary, rig so that only the very tip of the hook pokes out the back, and if the seem to not be giving it enough attention, I’ll put a drop of pro cure scent gel in the hook cavity. As far as movement, I’ve found a few pops will bring them up but I try keeping my lure as still as possible. When I find some spots feeding on bottom, I’ll drop straight to mud, reel up Just off the bottom 1-3’ , and give it three decent pops and kill it, if there is a spot, you can bet he’s gonna grab it.
  6. Intro

    My name is Corey Brown, I live on South Holston Lake and work at Painter Creek Marina, so I’m on the lake more than most. Although I’ve fished my entire life, this passed off season I decided to really take on bass fishing in all its glory and familiarize myself with multiple techniques and several other styles. I’ve mainly stuck with shallow to medium cranks, football jigs, Texas rigged worms, and soft plastic jerk baits. I can now say over the past 6 months I’ve expanded my lure comfortability extensively and would consider myself decently well rounded in the clear mountain lakes of the area, but am always looking to learn as much as I can. Any and all advice is welcome and I am happy to share what I have learned as well.
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