Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
SJK

Let's Go Fishing! Week 3 Recap

Recommended Posts

Let's Go Fishin'!

Host: Nathan Light

Speaker: Brad Burkhart

Brad’sSponsors: Mercury, Motorguide, Bass Pro Shops, Home Federal Bank, Killer BassBaits

Higher Ground Baptist Church

Kingsport, TN 1/26/2011

The Versatile Jig

Withmore winter weather knocking on thedoor everyone including host Nathan Light of 3B Outdoors wereunsure if the third night of the Let's Go Fishin'! seminar would continue asscheduled. Turns out for the first timethis year we dodged a bullet and would up with merely a few flurries to showfor the scare. Nathan suggests in thefuture if there is any question of weather you may check the Higher GroundWebsite at www.higherground.org, check your e-mail as he will send a notice as soon as possible, or you may callhim personally.

Once again,Nathan Light began the evening with a short devotional entitled The Power of Prayer. He shared hisown personal testimony with the group. Nathanwas 30 years old when he was first saved even though he grew up in church. He said "If I had died before I finallygot saved at 30 some Godly preacher man would have stood over my casket andtalked about how good of a man I was, what a good husband and father Iwas. I am all of those things, but thatdoesn't promise you a spot in heaven." It’s never too late to accept Jesus Christ as your lord and savior. Nathan read scripture from Jeremiah33-3. The verse describes the power ofprayer and the promise God gives to us to show us all great and mightythings. Nathan borrowed a line fromhis pastor, "Prayer is answered in three ways: Differently, denied,delayed." Trust in the lord with all your heart. Nathan ended his devotion with a challengefor the congregation, "Lets make a deal... Every time I think of you I will pray foryou. Every time you think of me pleasepray for me too."

The thirdspeaker out of eight in the series is the owner of Killer Bass Baits and Bass Pro Shops staffer, Brad Burkhart. Returning for his second consecutive year,Brad shared his personal experience as an angler and his expertise in the craftof making jigs to put together a solid power point presentation packed full ofuseful information.

Brad describeda jig simply as a weighted hook fitted with some sort of dressing meant toreassemble bass forage items in particularly crayfish. Morespecifically a jig is made of a hook, weighted head that may or may not bepainted, a dressing (hair, rubber, silicone, ext), sometimes a weed guard and"add-ons" ( trailers or chunks, scents, rattles).

Bradsuggests using a jig because, "ITS ALL GOOD! You can't go wrong. It is a year round bait." He referred back to an article he once readthat referred to BASS Elite Series Pro's Tommy Biffle, Denny Brauer, and DavidWalker as the "80% club." Thismeant these three guys agreed that they use jigs in at least 80% of alltournament fishing situations.

Oh... andthey catch BIG FISH!

When youbegin using a jig one of the most basic questions may be where to use thebait? Brad has three basic questions heapplies to answer the question: One, where are the fish? Two, what season isit? Three, what is the watertemperature?

Brad looksat his lures as tools. Each tool has itsown specific design and function and asks a different question to thefish. The answer to each question willlead an angler to solving the puzzle for the day.

Other thanthe jig itself, add-ons may be put on or taken away from the jig set up tooffer a different presentation. Rattleshave become a popular preference among today’s anglers. However, Brad only uses rattles in twosituations: When the water is dirty andthe fish, which have relatively poor eye sight anyway, are relyingpredominantly on their lateral lineto detect movement and sound under water. Two, when bass are on the bed and are in a defensive protectivestate. The rattles will annoy the bassenough to make it mad enough to strike it in a defensive reaction. Trailers are a commodity that can effect boththe action and the profile or size of the jig you are fishing. Rule-of-thumb is in the summer fish a largerprofiled bait with a faster action, but in the winter fish a smaller bait withless action. Brad believes scent is moreabout preference or confidence than necessity. If he needs scent he will usually switch to a power bait trailer ratherthan using a spray, gravy, or dip. Allof Killer Bass Baits Killer jigs come with "ears" or rattle holderwhere rattles may be put on or taken off with ease.

Beforebreaking down jig fishingin seasonal patterns let's define jigfishing techniques. Flipping isthe art of dropping a jig into an area where the fish reside from a closeproximity. Pitching is also fishing inclose proximity but is a little further away from the target. Rather than dropping a bait in, the bait istossed some distance first. Casting is when the angler launches the bait outaway from the boat. Swimming isthe art of jig fishing where the jig is retrieved much like a crankbait toreassemble fleeing prey rather then staying in constant contact with thesubstrate.

Winter

Temps will be 50degrees or less. The key to winterfishing is to SLOW everything down. Fishmain lake "stuff" like bluff ends, points, and deep water holes. Fish 45degree channel banks and look for big bait balls on your fish finder. In the winter bass are eating for survivalonly and can go days with out eating by lowering their body functions andslowing their metabolism. Fish in winterhave to seek the "comfort zone," or the right mixture of watertemperature and optimal dissolved oxygen levels. In the winter Brad uses light lines (10-14lbtest) Bass Pro ShopsXPS Fluorocarbon, small jigs (1/4 oz-3/8oz), small trailers and porks.

Spring

Watertemperatures will vary between 55 degrees- 65 degrees. Fish will still be lethargic early in theseason but will be very active in the mid to late season as the spawn comes into play. Spring time means bass willhave one thing on their minds, REPRODUCTION. Everything they do including eating is revolving aroundreproduction. The challenge offishing this time of year is being able to find the bass early in staging areasand being able to follow them up to the beds and back out in to their summerstomping grounds. Look for flats,secondary points, and some main channel points near spawning cover during thestaging time. Casting a football jig maybe effective during staging. Look forcover and structure when seeking beds. Flipping and pitching can lead to memorable catches of big pigs when yougo knocking on the doors to their beds. In spring, Brad will begin to go bigger with his gear. He will use 12lb-20lb fluorocarbon and 1/2 ozfootball or casting jigs.

Summer

Summerwater temperatures will start at 75 degrees and will often exceed 90degrees as we observed during the 2010 Professional AnglersAssociation event on Cherokee Lake. Like in the winter, summer time basswill be seeking the comfort zone. However, Brad insists that doesn't always mean they will be founddeep. Summer bass will seek areas ofshade and current where the water will be cooler and more oxygenated. Another important dynamic to look for in thehot summer months on deep lakes is the thermocline. The thermocline is basically a small area inthe water column with rapid change in temperature from the warmer water aboveand the cooler water below. Fish willrelate to thermocline like structure. Tofind it turn the sensitivity all the way up on your finder and look for eithera dark band in the open water or observe at what depth the bait fish arehanging around. Flipping as shallow as afoot of water or casting in 75 feet of water can both be effective summer timetechniques so the depth range is wide. Brad seeks out deep waterchannel breaks with 3/4oz football jigs, deep brush piles with 1/2ozkiller jigs, and shallow cover with killer jigs (flipping, pitching, andswimming).

Fall

Watertemperatures will be dropping in the fall from the 75 degree summer mark backto the 55 degree winter mark. In thefall one thing is important, THE FEED IS ON AND THE SPEED IS ON! Finding bait means finding bass and they willbe gorging themselves on the smorgasbords of shad preparing for the winterahead. Fall may be one of the best timesto practice with your swim jig imitation shad. Brad uses a white fat albert trailor on a lemonade colored killer jig. Also, Brad suggests seeking bridges in thefall. Brad and Nathan put on a great showin a 2010 episode of 3B Outdoors where they visited Douglas Lake and had greatsuccess.

*All seasons set-ups include 7'-7'6" rods, 6:2:1 reels, and Bass Pro Shops XPS Flourocarbon.

Brad believes in the three C's of jig fishing: Confidence, Contact, andConcentration.

Wednesday nights audience wasfull of questions for Brad.

Question:What weight do you use for a swimming jig?

Answer: I use a 1/2 oz killer jigusually lemonade color.

Question:Do you change anything from day to night?

Answer: No. I don't believe in"day time" and "night time" only lures. I feel like I cancatch fish with 10" worms and Colorado blades in the daytime as well sowhy should they be considered "night time" only baits?

Question:When swimming a jig, do you change your trailer?

Answer: Yes, I will use a fat albertor twin tail rather than a craw.

Question:When skipping, is the head shape important?

Answer: Yes, and after extensive onthe water testing the Killer jig is designed with a slight curvature in thehead which I feel like makes it skip more effectively.

Question:What knot do you use when tying jigs?

Answer: I always use a Palomar Knot especially with fluorocarbon.

Wayne Mullins, antiquelure collector, displayed his collection of fish "decoys." The fish decoys were used by Native Americanswhen the water would freeze over. The method was simple, cut out the ice and use the decoys to bring uppike, musky, or any other willing fish to chase the decoy as they moved itaround. When the fish followed thedecoys up the Natives would then use spears to take them. Attached is a photo of Wayne and hiscollection.

(Buy, trade, fishing related items. Old wood lures, plastic lures, old reels,old lure boxes. Contact Wayne Mullins 423 247 5433 oldplugs@chatertn.netof the National Lure Collector Club)

Special thanks to Luke and Ryan Morgan of Rogersville for their help indistributing door prizes. Door prizes are sponsored by: HigherGround Baptist Church, 3B Outdoors, Bass Pro Shops (Sevierville), Fat DaddyLures, Skeeter/Yamaha, ITT Blakemore Roadrunner, FLW Outdoors, PrudentialFinancial - Doug Trail, Outdoor View, 3:16 Lure Company, Andy Bradley, RonaldLawson, Gary Clark, Tennessee Christian Bass Anglers Junior Club

<br style="mso-special-character:line-break"><br style="mso-special-character:line-break">

Tournament information:

First, on April 16, 2011 John Gyuresik is directing a charityevent in honor of the Niswonger Children's Hospital on South Holston Lake. The tournament will begin with complimentary breakfast at 7AM and will weigh in with a complimentary meal for the anglers at 3PM from the Observation Knob Park in Bristol, TN. Entry for the event is100 dollars per two man team. First place is guaranteed $3,000 and a $200 prizeeach for big largemouth/smallmouth with second through eighth place beingpro-rated per number of entries. The event is currently seeking sponsorship anddonations of $1,000 (Spotted Bass Sponsor). For more information visit www.mountainsttesfoundaation.org . "Showyour support for Niswonger Children's Hospital by submitting a donation toMountain States Foundation."

Second, Fishing for Charities is an organization I am proudto be personally involved with as a Tennessee representative. FFC was foundedby Dwayne Linkous. Dwayne's son, Raiden, was diagnosed with Niemann-PickDisease early in his life. Long story short, Dwayne founded FFC in an effort tospread awareness, raise charity money, and give back to those who are helpinghis own family through. FFC hosts six regular season tournaments in three states(Cherokee, Douglas, Smith Mountain, Claytor, Norman, Hickory). Each tournamenthas its own designated charity (Niemann-Pick Disease,Relay for Life, National Autism Society, Wounded Warrior Project, Make-A-WishFoundation, and Victory Junction). For the first time ever, at theconclusion of the season we will host a Classic event with guaranteed $8,000shopping spree and more! Please visit our website or contact me personally forfurther information. www.fishingforcharities.net

Please feel free to contact me with any questions and catch this and everyre-cap in The Rogersville Review Weekend edition.

Josh Goan

Fishing For Charities

jgo1924@yahoo.com

www.fishingforcharities.net<br style="mso-special-character:line-break"><br style="mso-special-character:line-break">

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let's Go Fishin'!

Host: Nathan Light

Speaker: Brad Burkhart

Brad’sSponsors: Mercury, Motorguide, Bass Pro Shops, Home Federal Bank, Killer BassBaits

Higher Ground Baptist Church

Kingsport, TN 1/26/2011

The Versatile Jig

Withmore winter weather knocking on thedoor everyone including host Nathan Light of 3B Outdoors wereunsure if the third night of the Let's Go Fishin'! seminar would continue asscheduled. Turns out for the first timethis year we dodged a bullet and would up with merely a few flurries to showfor the scare. Nathan suggests in thefuture if there is any question of weather you may check the Higher GroundWebsite at www.higherground.org, check your e-mail as he will send a notice as soon as possible, or you may callhim personally.

Once again,Nathan Light began the evening with a short devotional entitled The Power of Prayer. He shared hisown personal testimony with the group. Nathanwas 30 years old when he was first saved even though he grew up in church. He said "If I had died before I finallygot saved at 30 some Godly preacher man would have stood over my casket andtalked about how good of a man I was, what a good husband and father Iwas. I am all of those things, but thatdoesn't promise you a spot in heaven." It’s never too late to accept Jesus Christ as your lord and savior. Nathan read scripture from Jeremiah33-3. The verse describes the power ofprayer and the promise God gives to us to show us all great and mightythings. Nathan borrowed a line fromhis pastor, "Prayer is answered in three ways: Differently, denied,delayed." Trust in the lord with all your heart. Nathan ended his devotion with a challengefor the congregation, "Lets make a deal... Every time I think of you I will pray foryou. Every time you think of me pleasepray for me too."

The thirdspeaker out of eight in the series is the owner of Killer Bass Baits and Bass Pro Shops staffer, Brad Burkhart. Returning for his second consecutive year,Brad shared his personal experience as an angler and his expertise in the craftof making jigs to put together a solid power point presentation packed full ofuseful information.

Brad describeda jig simply as a weighted hook fitted with some sort of dressing meant toreassemble bass forage items in particularly crayfish. Morespecifically a jig is made of a hook, weighted head that may or may not bepainted, a dressing (hair, rubber, silicone, ext), sometimes a weed guard and"add-ons" ( trailers or chunks, scents, rattles).

Bradsuggests using a jig because, "ITS ALL GOOD! You can't go wrong. It is a year round bait." He referred back to an article he once readthat referred to BASS Elite Series Pro's Tommy Biffle, Denny Brauer, and DavidWalker as the "80% club." Thismeant these three guys agreed that they use jigs in at least 80% of alltournament fishing situations.

Oh... andthey catch BIG FISH!

When youbegin using a jig one of the most basic questions may be where to use thebait? Brad has three basic questions heapplies to answer the question: One, where are the fish? Two, what season isit? Three, what is the watertemperature?

Brad looksat his lures as tools. Each tool has itsown specific design and function and asks a different question to thefish. The answer to each question willlead an angler to solving the puzzle for the day.

Other thanthe jig itself, add-ons may be put on or taken away from the jig set up tooffer a different presentation. Rattleshave become a popular preference among today’s anglers. However, Brad only uses rattles in twosituations: When the water is dirty andthe fish, which have relatively poor eye sight anyway, are relyingpredominantly on their lateral lineto detect movement and sound under water. Two, when bass are on the bed and are in a defensive protectivestate. The rattles will annoy the bassenough to make it mad enough to strike it in a defensive reaction. Trailers are a commodity that can effect boththe action and the profile or size of the jig you are fishing. Rule-of-thumb is in the summer fish a largerprofiled bait with a faster action, but in the winter fish a smaller bait withless action. Brad believes scent is moreabout preference or confidence than necessity. If he needs scent he will usually switch to a power bait trailer ratherthan using a spray, gravy, or dip. Allof Killer Bass Baits Killer jigs come with "ears" or rattle holderwhere rattles may be put on or taken off with ease.

Beforebreaking down jig fishingin seasonal patterns let's define jigfishing techniques. Flipping isthe art of dropping a jig into an area where the fish reside from a closeproximity. Pitching is also fishing inclose proximity but is a little further away from the target. Rather than dropping a bait in, the bait istossed some distance first. Casting is when the angler launches the bait outaway from the boat. Swimming isthe art of jig fishing where the jig is retrieved much like a crankbait toreassemble fleeing prey rather then staying in constant contact with thesubstrate.

Winter

Temps will be 50degrees or less. The key to winterfishing is to SLOW everything down. Fishmain lake "stuff" like bluff ends, points, and deep water holes. Fish 45degree channel banks and look for big bait balls on your fish finder. In the winter bass are eating for survivalonly and can go days with out eating by lowering their body functions andslowing their metabolism. Fish in winterhave to seek the "comfort zone," or the right mixture of watertemperature and optimal dissolved oxygen levels. In the winter Brad uses light lines (10-14lbtest) Bass Pro ShopsXPS Fluorocarbon, small jigs (1/4 oz-3/8oz), small trailers and porks.

Spring

Watertemperatures will vary between 55 degrees- 65 degrees. Fish will still be lethargic early in theseason but will be very active in the mid to late season as the spawn comes into play. Spring time means bass willhave one thing on their minds, REPRODUCTION. Everything they do including eating is revolving aroundreproduction. The challenge offishing this time of year is being able to find the bass early in staging areasand being able to follow them up to the beds and back out in to their summerstomping grounds. Look for flats,secondary points, and some main channel points near spawning cover during thestaging time. Casting a football jig maybe effective during staging. Look forcover and structure when seeking beds. Flipping and pitching can lead to memorable catches of big pigs when yougo knocking on the doors to their beds. In spring, Brad will begin to go bigger with his gear. He will use 12lb-20lb fluorocarbon and 1/2 ozfootball or casting jigs.

Summer

Summerwater temperatures will start at 75 degrees and will often exceed 90degrees as we observed during the 2010 Professional AnglersAssociation event on Cherokee Lake. Like in the winter, summer time basswill be seeking the comfort zone. However, Brad insists that doesn't always mean they will be founddeep. Summer bass will seek areas ofshade and current where the water will be cooler and more oxygenated. Another important dynamic to look for in thehot summer months on deep lakes is the thermocline. The thermocline is basically a small area inthe water column with rapid change in temperature from the warmer water aboveand the cooler water below. Fish willrelate to thermocline like structure. Tofind it turn the sensitivity all the way up on your finder and look for eithera dark band in the open water or observe at what depth the bait fish arehanging around. Flipping as shallow as afoot of water or casting in 75 feet of water can both be effective summer timetechniques so the depth range is wide. Brad seeks out deep waterchannel breaks with 3/4oz football jigs, deep brush piles with 1/2ozkiller jigs, and shallow cover with killer jigs (flipping, pitching, andswimming).

Fall

Watertemperatures will be dropping in the fall from the 75 degree summer mark backto the 55 degree winter mark. In thefall one thing is important, THE FEED IS ON AND THE SPEED IS ON! Finding bait means finding bass and they willbe gorging themselves on the smorgasbords of shad preparing for the winterahead. Fall may be one of the best timesto practice with your swim jig imitation shad. Brad uses a white fat albert trailor on a lemonade colored killer jig. Also, Brad suggests seeking bridges in thefall. Brad and Nathan put on a great showin a 2010 episode of 3B Outdoors where they visited Douglas Lake and had greatsuccess.

*All seasons set-ups include 7'-7'6" rods, 6:2:1 reels, and Bass Pro Shops XPS Flourocarbon.

Brad believes in the three C's of jig fishing: Confidence, Contact, andConcentration.

Wednesday nights audience wasfull of questions for Brad.

Question:What weight do you use for a swimming jig?

Answer: I use a 1/2 oz killer jigusually lemonade color.

Question:Do you change anything from day to night?

Answer: No. I don't believe in"day time" and "night time" only lures. I feel like I cancatch fish with 10" worms and Colorado blades in the daytime as well sowhy should they be considered "night time" only baits?

Question:When swimming a jig, do you change your trailer?

Answer: Yes, I will use a fat albertor twin tail rather than a craw.

Question:When skipping, is the head shape important?

Answer: Yes, and after extensive onthe water testing the Killer jig is designed with a slight curvature in thehead which I feel like makes it skip more effectively.

Question:What knot do you use when tying jigs?

Answer: I always use a Palomar Knot especially with fluorocarbon.

Wayne Mullins, antiquelure collector, displayed his collection of fish "decoys." The fish decoys were used by Native Americanswhen the water would freeze over. The method was simple, cut out the ice and use the decoys to bring uppike, musky, or any other willing fish to chase the decoy as they moved itaround. When the fish followed thedecoys up the Natives would then use spears to take them. Attached is a photo of Wayne and hiscollection.

(Buy, trade, fishing related items. Old wood lures, plastic lures, old reels,old lure boxes. Contact Wayne Mullins 423 247 5433 oldplugs@chatertn.netof the National Lure Collector Club)

Special thanks to Luke and Ryan Morgan of Rogersville for their help indistributing door prizes. Door prizes are sponsored by: HigherGround Baptist Church, 3B Outdoors, Bass Pro Shops (Sevierville), Fat DaddyLures, Skeeter/Yamaha, ITT Blakemore Roadrunner, FLW Outdoors, PrudentialFinancial - Doug Trail, Outdoor View, 3:16 Lure Company, Andy Bradley, RonaldLawson, Gary Clark, Tennessee Christian Bass Anglers Junior Club

<br style="mso-special-character:line-break"><br style="mso-special-character:line-break">

Tournament information:

First, on April 16, 2011 John Gyuresik is directing a charityevent in honor of the Niswonger Children's Hospital on South Holston Lake. The tournament will begin with complimentary breakfast at 7AM and will weigh in with a complimentary meal for the anglers at 3PM from the Observation Knob Park in Bristol, TN. Entry for the event is100 dollars per two man team. First place is guaranteed $3,000 and a $200 prizeeach for big largemouth/smallmouth with second through eighth place beingpro-rated per number of entries. The event is currently seeking sponsorship anddonations of $1,000 (Spotted Bass Sponsor). For more information visit www.mountainsttesfoundaation.org . "Showyour support for Niswonger Children's Hospital by submitting a donation toMountain States Foundation."

Second, Fishing for Charities is an organization I am proudto be personally involved with as a Tennessee representative. FFC was foundedby Dwayne Linkous. Dwayne's son, Raiden, was diagnosed with Niemann-PickDisease early in his life. Long story short, Dwayne founded FFC in an effort tospread awareness, raise charity money, and give back to those who are helpinghis own family through. FFC hosts six regular season tournaments in three states(Cherokee, Douglas, Smith Mountain, Claytor, Norman, Hickory). Each tournamenthas its own designated charity (Niemann-Pick Disease,Relay for Life, National Autism Society, Wounded Warrior Project, Make-A-WishFoundation, and Victory Junction). For the first time ever, at theconclusion of the season we will host a Classic event with guaranteed $8,000shopping spree and more! Please visit our website or contact me personally forfurther information. www.fishingforcharities.net

Please feel free to contact me with any questions and catch this and everyre-cap in The Rogersville Review Weekend edition.

Josh Goan

Fishing For Charities

jgo1924@yahoo.com

www.fishingforcharities.net<br style="mso-special-character:line-break"><br style="mso-special-character:line-break">

good read jamie! :thumbsup2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×